Information Anatomy

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Information Anatomy is an installation, which is designed to create a multi-sensory experience of data engagement. Participants were invited to talk to the installation using one word, that can represent their “emotion”. The printer would print out an info-graph that is the analysis about the emotion provided few seconds later, including how many people participated, how many people expressed the similar emotion, and time, temperature and other related factors. The purpose of this artifact is for testing how people perceive and engage with data.

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I went down yesterday …

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I went down yesterday to the Piraeus with Glaucon the son of Ariston by Plato. In The Republic, Book VII, Plato depicts a cave where people have been imprisoned from birth. These prisoners are chained so that their legs and necks are fixed, forcing them to gaze at the wall in front of them. The prisoners cannot see any of what is happening behind them, they are only able to see the shadows cast upon the cave wall in front of them. Socrates suggests that the shadows are reality for the prisoners because they have never seen anything else. Details »

a room with a view

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In the beginning of 2016, an exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery in London used the term “electronic superhighway” to address artistic forms and languages in the media age. In a Guardian review, we are described as “roadkill” on this superhighway. The freedom of information has brought great convenience: mobile pay, location sharing and all-round social networking softwares have endowed us with legitimate avatars of ourselves in the digital world. However, in the same time, it also interrogates Details »

News Scope

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“News” takes online news feed and converts them into keywords based on a customised semantic analysis. The final result was an interactive experience, which participants signed to a piece of real time news from the web and they could comment or fake a story. By creating a mediated space, the piece encourages people to re-explore and re-sense the physical world as they find their way out in the virtual yet physical maze. The work was first showed at “Artist.log” event at Westlake, Apple Store.
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Third Eye

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Third Eye is an interactive installation, isolating people’s visual perception from the physical world. The piece is a wearable device composed of two parts: a wifi lens camera, AR glasses, and a re-designed helmet. When put on, the device will offer the user a sequence of mediated perspectives, higher vision, mirrored vision, and upside down vision. The experience environment of Third Eye is composed of three parts: the device, a maze, and the user. Although the system is the same, identical results will occur depending on the Details »

Surveillance 2.0

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Surveillance II is a piece composed of an arabidopsis plant and a digital screen. On the space station, normal arabidopsis plants used to be exposed under different environmental conditions for scientific examination. In Surveillance II, an arabidopsis plant is positioned in a “space capsule”, the micro-environment data (wind, light, air pressure) is synced with that of the location where the news takes place. Meanwhile, as a response to these “news radiation”, the oxygen released by the plant is also tracked and displayed in real-time. Details »

Place Talk

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Place-Talk is about conversation and places, exploring how local people from one specific site respond to the curiosity of people from other places. The idea is to have a travelling box as a metaphor of a traveller who is tired of travel guides websites and apps, and who wants to understand the destination via conversations with locals.The box itself is also a physicalisation in response to virtual dialogues.
There is a screen on the box, displaying messages from people who submit messages on the project website. Details »

WOW! CCAA

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WOW! CCAA^1 is an archival visualisation collaboratively developed by Cedar Zhou and Iris Long. It explores how data visualisation fits into contemporary exhibition/museum knowledge transfer and aesthetic experience. WOW! CCAA is composed of two parts: a looping seven-minute sequence of programmed frameworks, and a visitor interaction mechanism called CCAA Now, projected onto a 35-metre-long corridor in Shanghai Power Station of Art. While the physical corridor links exhibition spaces, Details »

Urbanscope

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Cooperated with Wang Yi, Urbanscope is inspired by the simplicity, precision and geometry of Audi car wheel design, and one of the masterpieces of natural forms: the fractal (snowflake). Urbanscope is a homage both to nature and the man-made city. Based on scanned QR Codes, abstract visual patterns evolve by decoding the technical information related to specific Audi tyres. An experimental interactive information wall about a small detail of cars and urban transportation – tires. Using immersive animated visualization, Details »

Information in Style

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“Information In Style: Information Visualization in the UK” was launched at CAFA Art Museum on September 20, 2013. The exhibition is supported by CAFA Art Museum, CAFA Design School, British Council and Beijing International Design Week. As part of the project, “Information In Style” symposium invited leading UK information designers and educators to deliver keynote speeches and to join panel discussion with Chinese professionals. Invited speakers include: CEO and curator of FutureEverything, Drew Hemment; Details »

Brave New World

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Brave New World is a site specific participatory art-work, which invites participants to provide their views(image) and emotions to the real time analysis and visualization system through Twitter. The system will generate a collective image of emotions and images about the space in real time. The work is designed to make virtual communication tangible to explore the relationship between people’s perceptions and both coded physical and virtual spaces. The colour of the emotion is based by Plutchik’s wheel of emotions. Details »